Growth Product Managers: You should learn to code Python. Here’s why:

Python code

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Growth Product Managers and Growth ‘Hackers’ should learn to code Python: it saves time by automating reporting and analysis, and it will make you a little less dependent on your data science team and a little more confident to go looking through your analytics data yourself.

I run Growth and Monetisation for HERE’s consumer app business. We have an Android and iOS app, a mobile web app and a desktop web product. We are collecting a ton of app usage and attribution analytics, but they are spread out across multiple places: mobile attributions in Adjust, mobile analytics in Amplitude, web analytics in SiteCatalyst, and so on.

The dashboards provided by the analytics tools are great, but I found myself logging into multiple web dashboards every morning, exporting CSV files and importing them into an excel file to get just the view of the data that I wanted. I was spending 30 minutes per day just cutting and moving data around to get the view I wanted, and I decided there must be a way to automate it.

There are a few options when it comes to scripting languages to let you easily pull and manipulate data sets. Your data science team probably uses R, but for Growth PMs a great place to start is Python. Python is a general-purpose interpreted scripting language that is both extremely versatile and easy to learn. It is inherently great at working with data sets, but there are also a ton of additional libraries available designed especially for data science that make fetching and analysing large data sets, like your app analytics, really easy.

Here are a handful of things you can build yourself with a bit of Python scripting knowledge:

  • Automate checking your dashboards and compiling data in the way you want to see it.
  • Save time manually exporting CSV files from different sources and creating an Excel file to see the data how you want to see it: use python to pull all the data sources automatically and crunch them into the right format.
  • Perform basic analysis automatically at regular intervals and email yourself and your team the results.
  • Create an automated ‘early warning’ system: if any of your key metrics start changing (going up or down) at a certain rate, create an alert email. This is a script that could run automatically a few times per day to monitor key stats and email you and your team when any key metric starts changing drastically.

Example
As an example, I uploaded one of my basic scripts to GitHub. Take a look here.
This basic script does a couple of things:

  • Allows you to specify a couple of frame variables at the top for how you want the data returned: you can specify the period, the channel grouping, and choose between active or new users.
  • Pulls app analytics data from Amplitude for an Android and iOS app sequentially.
  • Adds two columns to the end, one for the standard deviation and one for the % change between the last two complete periods.
  • The script prints out the channels that have gone up or down by more than 2%. (This variable is configurable at the top of the script as well, allowing you to adjust the sensitivity).
  • For data that is grouped by Country, it will also print the % change for a list of pre-defined ‘Key Markets’.

This is just one simple example for one particular analysis – but you could write a script to pull and combine data in any way you choose, depending on the analysis you want to perform/automate.
(This post is not intended as a ‘how-to’, but if you want help, you can contact me. Also there are some resources for getting started with Python at the bottom of this post.)

The best Growth PMs live and breathe their data. Learning to manipulate and analyse your product’s data with Python will save you time by allowing you to automate many reporting and analysis tasks. The act of working with your data at a raw level will also help you fully understand it.

Your data science team are of course the experts, and you’re not likely to become more competent in programmatic data science than they are – but you can learn enough to make yourself just self-sufficient enough to be able to answer your most burning questions immediately, and you don’t rely only on your data scientists and analysts to create the reports and dashboards you need.

Resources and getting started
There are a ton of great resources out there to help you learn Python. Some assume previous programming experience, and others are designed for absolute beginners. It really doesn’t matter if you’ve never programmed before (although, of course, it certainly helps). If you have a good understanding of data manipulation in Excel, for example, you should be able to pick up data analysis with Python with a bit of patience and practice.

Some resources to get you started:

  • datacamp.com is a great place to learn the basics of Python for Data Science. The basic python course is free, and $25 will get you access to the intermediate course, which covers the most important things you’ll need when using Python for data analysis.
  • A more general Python beginners course is available at codecademy.com.
  • The O’Reilly books are relatively expensive, but they’re the classics.
  • Of course, stackoverflow.com is a gold mine for budding and advanced programmers.

Note
Although I studied Computer Engineering I don’t consider myself a programmer. My scripts focus on simplicity and getting the job done, and in so doing break occasional rules and programming best practices (I use global variables a lot, my conventions are sloppy, etc). But that doesn’t matter. As Growth PMs, we’re not contributing to a large codebase with lots of other developers: we’re programming just for us. So don’t get caught up in conventions, unless they help you write code that you can understand.

The Complete Product Manager

Being a great Product Manager in tech is more than shuffling roadmaps and writing user stories.

Great PMs are first and foremost masters of their market: the segments, the customers, and their needs, and they spend a great deal of time talking to customers themselves and conducting field research.

Great PMs are the walking embodiment of their product and their vision. Great PMs want to build great things, and naturally inspire people to join them.

Great PMs understand how their product idea will become a product business, and they understand what needs to get done to get there.

Great PMs know and respect their competition, but they are not intimidated and focus on solving users’ problems better rather than comparing feature lists.

Great PMs are masters of their domain of business and are thought leaders of their industry.

Great PMs are driven by intuition, but formulate hypotheses and test them using rigorous analytical methodology.

Great PMs understand how technology can help solve customer problems in new and delightful ways.

Great PMs have a natural sense for design and focus relentlessly on the end-to-end User Experience.

Great PMs have a growth mindset, and build a platform for systematic growth for their products from day one.

Great PMs are natural born leaders. They inspire and motivate, rather than dictate.

Great PMs are passionate, resourceful and curious. Great PMs are relentless in the pursuit of a better product.

 

 
The Complete Product Owner

 

 

Messaging and Chat are the next big channel for Growth

Growth is about finding new channels.

Messaging in general as a channel is young and fresh – and there will be a goldrush very, very soon. Services like Slack and Facebook Messenger are following the lead set by the asian chat successes like Line and WeChat in turning chat into a platform that allows access to services over the top – services like payments, shopping, games and more.

You can now order an Uber by typing a command in Slack, or you can order a pizza within the WeChat app in China.

What happens when chat becomes our interface with the world?

Before the point-and-click windows-based GUI evolved, the earliest PCs running DOS or similar operating systems had a ‘chat-style’ interface – a command line.

Messaging could be the next Operating System, and the starting point could be, once again, the command line. The difference is this time the abstraction level is much, much higher. Instead of a command like cd /uber which would change your working directory to the one called ‘uber’, now a command like /uber ride can literally order you an Uber. What’s old is new again.

There is a big possibility chat will be the next user interface. Chat – or personal assistants – or more likely a combination of both – will replace the apps grid as the next major UI paradigm. The chat window is always open. Yes, you use it to talk to your colleagues or friends – but it is already replacing email, and will piece-by-pice replace everything else around it. It’s so much easier to order an uber by typing “/uber ride” into the chat window that’s already open, than pulling your phone out, unlocking it, opening an app, etc.

(As a fun thought experiment: What comes next? What does the next part of the cycle look like? What does a GUI for chat look like?)

OKRs: How we use OKRs to empower teams

I did a presentation at the ProductTank Berlin February event last night.

My slides are available here.

I’m happy to chat more about OKRs, and how we work. Contact me!

Will Gill at ProductTank Berlin, February 2016

Amazon Kindle and the Perfect Product Vision

In the recent fantastic piece on The Verge covering interviews with the top brass behind the Amazon Kindle, the ultimate product vision behind the Kindle series of eReaders is articulated beautifully. From the article:

For Amazon, paper is more than a material for making prototypes. It’s the inspiration for the Kindle of the future: a weightless object that lasts more or less forever and is readable in any light. “Paper is the gold standard,” Green says. “We’re striving to hit that. And we’re taking legitimate steps year over year to get there.”

The beauty of this is its simplicity. Amazon are striving to create electronic paper. “Paper is the gold standard. We’re striving to hit that.”

There is nothing here about the joy of reading, or empowering people through instant delivery of information, or making money. The beauty of this is that all of those things flow naturally from the core premise: to make better, electronic paper.

This is what the Kindle team says about itself. It’s clear, it’s inspiring – and it’s impossible to misunderstand.

Compare that with this:

“Reach the largest daily audience in the world by connecting everyone to their world via our information sharing and distribution platform products and be one of the top revenue generating Internet companies in the world.”

That mouthful appeared on a slide at Twitter’s first analyst day. Inspiring? Do you even understand what the hell its trying to say? It could mean anything and everything – and that’s the problem.

Imagine your first day on the job at Amazon in the Kindle division. You ask, “So what is our mission? What are we trying to do?” In answer, someone might hand you a piece of paper, and tell you: “We want to make that.”

A good product vision is inspiring and motivating; an irresistible imagined future that pulls you towards it like gravity. But a good vision is also impossible to misunderstand. Everybody should share the same view, and be pulled in the same direction.

Product Manager in the middle

The Product Manager isn’t just a middle-man.

If you’re a PM, and your answer to every question is: “I don’t know, I need to go and ask ___”, then I’m afraid you’re doing something wrong.

You might not be able to give engineering estimates, but you should know your team and your technology well enough to give an educated guess; even if you have to follow up by saying “I’ll double-check that with engineering and get back to you.”

You might not have a slide prepared on every possible strategy question, but you should be able to form an opinion immediately if somebody throws you a strategy curve-ball.

You might not have the answer – but you should at least have an opinion.

Good Product Managers don’t wait to be told what to do by stakeholders. They anticipate stakeholder needs and suggest new ideas.

Good Product Managers don’t push decision-making up to senior management. They take responsibility, and if anything push decision-making down. Either way, they stand accountable for the decision and own up to it.

Good Product Managers never say “I don’t agree with this decision, but…”. Even if they think it.

No company needs more middle-men.

Companies need passion, vision and conviction. Grit.

Kickstarting Potato Salad

In case you missed it (although the tech press have had little else to report on today, it seems), some guy launched a kickstarter project with the ambitious goal of raising $10 to make a potato salad. (Link)

The project description:

“I’m making potato salad. Basically I’m just making potato salad. I haven’t decided what kind yet.”

On one hand, it’s absurd. It’s something like the tech equivalent of lighting your cigar with a burning $100 bill. It’s opulent, conspicuous consumption. Frivolous and wasteful, it seems to embody at least partly the recent backlash against the Silicon Valley tech industry, and the accusations that money is being invested generally into products and services aimed at making life cushy for the privileged and entitled elite, while more fundamental problems concerning the welfare of everyone are ignored.

On the other hand, why not? If people want to shell out their own hard-earned cash for something so frivolous, and have a bit of fun with it, why not let them? Although gratuitously wasteful, it’s not really doing any harm to the world as we know it. And maybe it might make a couple of people chuckle when they receive their $3 portion of potato salad.

Microsoft: Services Everywhere (not Windows Everywhere)

I came across two interesting pieces of Microsoft news today.

Firstly, Microsoft have bought the company behind a Visual Studio plugin called UnityVS which enables developers using the cross platform game engine, Unity, to write and debug their Unity programs directly within Visual Studio. Unity has support for all the major mobile operating systems, and then some – and Microsoft is slashing the existing $99 price tag and giving it away to developers for free. (Link)

In other words, Microsoft are investing in, and giving away for free, tools to make it easier to port games to a variety of platforms. Instead of reinforcing the old paradigm of “Windows everywhere”, they are literally helping to strengthen competitor platforms like iOS and Android.

The second piece of news was a rumour concerning a possible upcoming wearable device. (Link) Other than the first gasp-moment that it might not have a screen at all, the real news here was the rumour that the device might be compatible with Android and iOS mobile devices. This, compared with the wearable strategies of Android, iOS and Tizen (Samsung) devices, is a revolution. All the competitors mentioned here enforce a strict our-platform-only policy when it comes to their wearable offerings: the Tizen-powered Gear devices only pair with Samsung Galaxy devices, Android Wear only works with recent Android and the rumoured iWatch will of course only work with iOS devices. And here’s Microsoft with a device that could work with anything.

What does it mean? Perhaps it is a recognition of the inevitability of an Android/Apple-dominated smartphone market for the foreseeable future. Maybe it’s a strategy to increase sales: after all, Visual Studio still costs, and it also needs Windows to run; and the sales forecasts of any wearable device that only works with Windows Phone devices could not have been good (a tiny fraction of a tiny fraction). Either way, it’s a far-cry from the Microsoft of the 90’s and 2000’s and “Windows everywhere”, and it’s certainly some more clear signs of the company’s increasing play to become services-first.

Amazon Dash is another great example of un-bundling the smartphone

The newly launched Amazon Dash device (link) is a single-purpose hardware device that allows users to scan the items in their fridge or pantry that they’re running low on, and an order is automatically sent to Amazon’s fresh grocery service.

I find it very interesting because it is representative of how you can now build hardware so cheaply that the advantages of the unique form-factor versus a smartphone app outweigh the marginal cost of purchasing the hardware.

Sure you could do everything Dash does with a smartphone app… but having dedicated hardware makes it easy, and it is cheap (enough).

As the cost of embedded processing, sensors and (in some cases) glass continues to collapse, I predict we’ll see even more smartphone un-bundling into discreet, single-purpose connected hardware devices.

What the Whatsapp deal can teach all Product Managers

There are lots of lessons behind the curtains of the $19 BN Whatsapp acquisition by Facebook. There’s lessons about the scale and value of social, about the continually evolving mobile platform. There’s of course the rags-to-riches story of the founders going from food stamps to being billionaires in just a few short years, and a casual reminder that investment bankers are greedy.

But a few layers deeper there’s another lesson. It’s simple:

Whatsapp was not the first mobile messaging app.

When talking with Product Managers at lots of different companies I often hear sentences like these:

  • That’s not ‘new’ enough.
  • No, there’s already an app that does that.
  • If we could just find a completely new idea…

The problem is:

“There are no new ideas under the sun.”

Whatsapp was not the first mobile messaging app, and Facebook was not the first social network.

So what is the lesson? You don’t need to be first to win.

In fact, often not being first is an advantage. Look at Facebook – Mark Zuckerberg was able to learn from the failings of all the social networks that came before him. He learnt the importance of scaling from the failed Friendster, whose incredible pains scaling under rapid growth ultimately killed it. He learnt about network interactions from MySpace, which was still the biggest social network in 2006.

Another particularly good example: look at the category of To-Do List apps. There are literally hundreds in the app stores, and more pop up every month. Some are more successful than others, but the most successful ones, such as Wunderlist (currently #44 on the iOS store, and #29 grossing app), have only been around a relatively short amount of time. There were countless To-Do list apps before Wunderlist, and there’ll be countless more. What makes Wunderlist successful?

The value in a new product or service is seldom that it finds a completely unmet need. The value is often solving a known need in a new and innovative way.

When looking at product opportunities, the question is not if there is another product that solves the problem you intend to solve. The question is: can we be different? Can we be better?

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